Croatia - Country Commercial Guide
Investment Climate Statement

The Investment Climate Statement Chapter of the CCG is provided by the State Department. Any questions on the ICS can be directed to EB-ICS-DL@state.gov.

Last published date: 2021-09-16

The U.S. Department of State Investment Climate Statements provide information on the business climates of more than 170 economies and are prepared by economic officers stationed in embassies and posts around the world. They analyze a variety of economies that are or could be markets for U.S. businesses.

Topics include Openness to Investment, Legal and Regulatory systems, Dispute Resolution, Intellectual Property Rights, Transparency, Performance Requirements, State-Owned Enterprises, Responsible Business Conduct, and Corruption.

These statements highlight persistent barriers to further U.S. investment. Addressing these barriers would expand high-quality, private sector-led investment in infrastructure, further women’s economic empowerment, and facilitate a healthy business environment for the digital economy.

Executive Summary

Croatia’s EU membership has enhanced its economic stability and provided new opportunities for trade and investment. Despite having access to a substantial amount of EU funds, the Croatian economy has yet to gain the full benefits of membership in terms of growth and sustainability. Croatia will receive more than $30 billion in EU funding through 2030, which has the potential to provide a significant boost to the economy, if the government directs the funds to productive activities that stimulate job creation and growth. Croatia joined the European Exchange Rate Mechanism (ERM II) in July 2020, and the government is committed to eurozone accession by mid-2024.

The Croatian economy had experienced a five-year period of growth and stability, but the COVID-19 pandemic coupled with three devastating earthquakes that caused more than $20.3 billion worth of damage to Zagreb and central Croatia led the economy to contract by 8.4 percent in 2020. The budget deficit reached approximately 7.4 percent of GDP in 2020. The tourism sector, which directly accounts for 12 percent of Croatia’s GDP and indirectly as much as 20 percent, achieved only 50 percent of the prior year’s revenues. The government doled out more than $1.5 billion in job-retention and economic stabilization measures. Unemployment in January 2021 was at 7.1 percent, only slightly higher than the average rate in 2019. The European Commission estimates that the Croatian economy will grow 5.3 percent in 2021 and 4.6 percent in 2022.

The economy is burdened by a large government bureaucracy, underperforming state-owned enterprises, and low regulatory transparency, all of which contribute to poor performance and relatively low levels of foreign investment. The Croatian government has taken some positive steps to reduce para-fiscal fees and taxes and to simplify procedures for opening a business. However, it has been slow to implement additional steps to reduce barriers to investment, streamline bureaucracy and public administration, and reform the judiciary. The government continues to implement economic reforms designed to create sustainable economic growth and development, to connect education to the labor market, and to sustain public finances.

The government is willing to meet at senior levels with interested investors and to assist in resolving problems. Prime Minister Andrej Plenkovic, elected to a second consecutive term in July 2020, is a former member of the European Parliament and has signaled his commitment to wide-ranging structural reforms in line with recommendations from the EU and global financial institutions. His government is working with the World Bank and other international institutions to improve the business climate and to attract investment. Relative strengths in the Croatian economy include low inflation, a stable exchange rate, and developed infrastructure.

Historically, the most promising sectors for investment in Croatia have been tourism, telecommunications, pharmaceuticals, healthcare, and banking. Investment opportunities are growing in Croatia’s robust IT sector, and the coming years will offer new opportunities related to energy transition. Starting in 2020, Croatia offers visas for so-called “digital nomads” to work in Croatia without having to pay local taxes in order to attract individuals with bigger spending capabilities and connections to strong IT sectors abroad. To access the ICS, visit the U.S. Department of State Investment Climate Statement website.