Aerospace India
India Aerospace Trade Mission
Join ITA's business development mission to India to find business partners, gain market insights, make industry contacts, solidify business strategies, and advance specific projects.

DATES: September 19-23, 2022

Aerospace Trade Mission to India

Join Us

The United States Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration (ITA), is organizing an Aerospace Trade Mission to New Delhi and Hyderabad, India, September 19-23, 2022, along with optional stops in Bangalore or Mumbai, India.

The purpose of the mission is to introduce U.S. companies to India’s aerospace ecosystem and assist delegate companies with finding business partners and exporting their products and services to the region. The mission will help participating firms and organizations gain market insights, make industry contacts, solidify business strategies, and advance specific projects, with the goal of increasing U.S. exports to India. By participating in an official U.S. industry delegation, rather than traveling to India on their own, U.S. companies will enhance their ability to secure meetings and gain greater exposure to India.

The mission will include customized one-on-one business appointments with pre-screened potential buyers, agents, distributors, and joint venture partners. It will also include meetings with central, state, and local government officials and industry leaders, as well as networking events.

Apply Now to Join the Aerospace Trade Mission to India.

Why You Should Join

Mission Participants will:

  • Gain market insights, make industry and government contacts, solidify business strategies, and advance specific projects. 
  • Learn about Indian market priorities, policy and regulatory changes, projects, and business opportunities.
  • Have one-on-one business appointments with pre-screened potential buyers, agents, distributors, or joint venture partners in New Delhi and Hyderabad with optional appointments available in Bengaluru and Mumbai.
  • Participate in Networking Receptions.

Targeted U.S. Products and Services

The mission is designed for U.S. firms and organizations who play a part in the industry, especially those with products in the following categories:

  • Airport infrastructure
  • ICT/security systems
  • Aerospace equipment
  • Avionics
  • Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul (MRO)
  • Training
  • Unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technologies
  • Space technologies

Optional Stops Business Matchmaking (Gold Key Service)

Mission participants may request Gold Key business matchmaking service at one of the other five CS posts in India: Bengaluru, Mumbai, Chennai, Ahmedabad, or Kolkata. The two most promising cities for this are Bengaluru and Mumbai - two major technology and innovation hubs in India.

Schedule

PROPOSED TIMETABLE:

*Note: The final schedule and potential site visits will depend on the availability of host government and business officials, specific goals of mission participants, and ground transportation.

 

Monday

September 19, 2022

  • Trade Mission Participants Arrive in New Delhi, India

Tuesday

September 20, 2022

  • Plenary Session - U.S. Embassy officials welcome delegation
  • Market Briefing: The Aerospace Sector in India - Opportunities and Challenges
  • B2B and B2G Meetings for Mission Delegates in Delhi
  • Site visit at AIESL MRO workshops (TBC)
  • Reception Hosted by USIBC/USISPF/AmCham/Other (TBC)

Wednesday

September 21, 2022

  • B2B and B2G Meetings for Mission Delegates in Delhi
  • Flight to Hyderabad
  • Networking Reception Hosted by Local Chamber (TBC)

Thursday

September 22, 2022

  • B2B and B2G Meetings for Mission Delegates in Hyderabad
  • Departure for Optional Spin-Offs

Friday

September 23, 2022

  • B2B and B2G Meetings in Spin-Off Locations (Mumbai/Bengaluru)
  • Departure for the United States

Fees & Expenses

  • $2,800 USD for small or medium-sized enterprises
  • $5,500 for large companies
  • $1,000 for each additional firm representative (large firm or SME/trade organization)

Optional stop in Bengaluru or Mumbai: Additional Gold Key Service Fee of $950/small, $2,300/medium, & $3,400/large firm, including direct costs

*Expenses for travel, lodging, meals and incidentals will be the responsibility of each mission participant.

How to Apply

Applicants must submit a completed and signed mission application and supplemental application materials, including adequate information on their products and/or services, primary market objectives, and goals for participation no later than August 12, 2022.

Submitting an application is indication of your interest to participate in the mission. No fees are due at the time of registering your intent to join the mission. Once you are invited to join the mission payment of mission fees and the signature of the participation agreement is then due in order to participate in the mission.

AEROSPACE TRADE MISSION TO INDIA

September 19 - 23, 2022

Mission Description

The United States Department of Commerce, International Trade Administration (ITA), is organizing an Aerospace Trade Mission to India on September 19-23, 2022.

The purpose of the mission is to introduce U.S. companies to India’s aerospace ecosystem and assist delegate companies with finding business partners and exporting their products and services to the region.  The mission will target approximately fifteen U.S. companies and trade association representatives with members that provide products and services related to airport infrastructure, ICT/security systems, aerospace equipment, avionics, Maintenance, Repair, and Overhaul (MRO), training, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) technologies, and possibly space technologies. It is possible to increase this number to as high as 25 if we limit the number of Gold Keys and one-on-one matchmaking services to 10 of the delegates.  This is necessary since the mission is constrained to one and a half days per mission stop, so this is already between 30 and 50 B2Bs per stop. 

Mission delegates will have access to business development opportunities across India.  Participating firms will gain market insight, make industry contacts, solidify business strategies, and advance specific projects, with the goal of increasing U.S. exports of products and services in the aerospace sector. The subsectors will depend on the nature of the market, potential demand, prospective government procurements, and other factors closer to the start of recruitment.

The mission will include customized one-on-one business appointments with pre-screened potential buyers, agents, distributors, and joint venture partners. It will also include meetings with central, state, and local government officials and industry leaders, as well as networking events.  The mission will include stops in New Delhi and Hyderabad, with optional stops in Mumbai and Bengaluru. 

Commercial Setting 

India’s civil aviation market, the third largest in the world by passenger numbers after China and the United States, is expected to continue to grow rapidly following recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the International Air Transport Association (IATA), by 2035, India’s passenger growth forecast is 442 million, with the aviation industry supporting 19.1 million jobs and contributing $172 billion to its GDP. According to a Boeing market forecast, India is expected to need an additional 2,500 passenger aircraft. India has a 20-year roadmap to develop civil aviation and envisions a five-fold increase in airports in order to handle over one billion trips a year. 

The Indian market is particularly promising for U.S. suppliers seeking direct export opportunities, whether through direct sales or via joint-venture opportunities that align with India’s “Make in India” initiative to enhance indigenous manufacturing – a requirement for some aerospace OEMs to do business in the market, depending on the product and subsector. Indian aerospace companies are trying to evolve as serious players in the global market. The evolution of the Indian aerospace industry is part of a broader industry trend toward supply chain consolidation and the embrace of lean manufacturing.

The primary market access issue to be addressed is the focus that the Government of India (GOI) is placing on indigenous manufacturing over imports. In its revisions to procurement regulations, the GOI is pushing for foreign OEMs sector to invest in India, setting up Joint Ventures to manufacture locally, thereby building up India’s indigenous production capabilities for both the Indian and export markets.

Through its bilateral engagement, CS India and interagency colleagues continue to emphasize to the GOI that 1) investment follows exports, and that India must remain open to foreign exports to meet its aerospace and defense needs; and 2) critical components will continue to need      to be imported – not everything can or will be made in India. 

Timing is ideal given the hope that the aerospace sector in India is projected to rebound in 2022-23. This mission will position U.S. suppliers to secure contracts with agents, distributors, end users, and the government at an opportune time when the sector is on a growth trajectory. 

Impact of the Pandemic on India’s Civil Aviation Sector

The COVID-19 pandemic has deeply impacted the global aviation sector, and India is no exception.  Given the current situation, the Indian government initially grounded all scheduled domestic and international air services. The industry may undergo complete restructuring to meet the challenges ahead, resulting in lower revenues and higher fixed costs. Business models, traffic growth, fleet expansion, pricing, and costs may have to be made reconsidered. 

The Indian Ministry of Civil Aviation is aggressively working towards a “new normal” in the aviation sector, resulting in new opportunities for U.S. exporters. Solutions such as paperless operations will increase. Under the international “bubble” travel arrangements that India has secured with countries around the world, revised arrangements for direct flights that provide increased hygiene and safety protocols with limited touch points are also being introduced. Under the Government of India’s (GoI) “Make-in-India” initiative to bolster domestic manufacturing, technology collaboration with international OEMs is being targeted.

Bilateral Cooperation

Bilateral cooperation between India and the United States in the aerospace field is on a positive trajectory.  Aviation cooperation is a major element of the commercial relationship between India and the United States. A public-private partnership under the U.S.–India Aviation Cooperation Program (ACP) that includes the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the U.S. Trade and Development Agency (USTDA), the U.S. Commercial Service, and other U.S. Government agencies and U.S. companies supports the growth of the Indian civil aerospace sector. This is done by working directly with the GoI to identify and execute projects to encourage collaborations with U.S. and Indian stakeholders in the area of aerospace technology and the sharing of best practices. In 2022, ACP stakeholders are planning to support a reverse trade missions (RTM) focused on Cargo and Aviation Security, a U.S. India Aviation Summit, and an Executive Development Training Program (EDTP) with the Ministry of Civil Aviation.

Airport Infrastructure

The Airports Authority of India (AAI), a nodal authority under the Ministry of Civil Aviation, is responsible for creating, upgrading, maintaining, and managing civil aviation infrastructure in India. It owns approximately 125 airports and is one of the largest airport operators in the world. India’s current airport infrastructure consists of 450 airstrips across the country, although only 100 are considered fully operational. Foreign direct investment (FDI) up to 100 percent is allowed for civil aviation infrastructure, while airline stakes greater than 49 percent requires government approval. By 2024, India has ambitions to add 100 new airports to the existing number infrastructure.  This will generate opportunities to supply airport and aircraft decontamination solutions, safety and security equipment, digital connectivity, regional jet and commuter airline services, pilot training, and Maintenance Repair Operations (MRO) facilities.

As India builds greenfield and brownfield airports over the next 10 years there will be growing opportunities in airport planning and development, sustainable airports, safety and security, body scanners, MRO, and digital systems. Policy reforms such as the inclusion of aviation turbine fuel in the Goods and Services Tax (GST) would create opportunities for U.S. companies to address India’s shortage of Maintenance Repair Operations (MRO) facilities.  Large airport expansion projects include Delhi’s Indira Gandhi International Airport, which is currently undergoing an expansion to increase its cargo and passenger handling capacity. A second airport for the National Capital Region is planned at Jewar, Uttar Pradesh (UP). The Uttar Pradesh Government has also announced the Ayodhya International airport project. Work is in progress on greenfield airport development in Mumbai (Navi Mumbai International Airport) and Goa (MOPA). Most major airports are aiming to increase airside and terminal capacity to meet demand.  In October 2021, the Indian Ministry of Civil Aviation announced the privatization of an additional 13 airports over a six-month period, and a total of 25 over the next four years.   These projects present significant export opportunities for U.S. suppliers.

India’s Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Sector

In recent years, the Government of India (GOI) has focused on acquiring advanced technologies to meet demands in the security and defense sectors.   One such emerging technology is the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV), which is now playing a significant role across a range of sectors in India and around the world.  In FY2020, India’s UAV Market was valued at $830 million, and it is projected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 14.5 percent during the 2021 – 2026 period, despite the effects of the global pandemic on many sectors of the economy.  The Indian UAV market has the potential to cross $900 million by the end of 2021. 

In June 2021, India’s Ministry of Civil Aviation (MoCA) released a new set of drone laws and regulations for operating UAVs in India, which is anticipated to create significant market opportunities for both domestic and international suppliers.  UAVs are becoming more widely utilized in the following sectors in India: agriculture, forestry, mining, power, railways, construction, highways, e-commerce, homeland security, smart city and urban development projects, and media. Applications include site inspections, surveillance, and monitoring to capture and disseminate real time data.   Apart from manufacturing, opportunities exist for U.S. companies in the areas of hardware, software applications, and value-added components.  

India’s Commercial Space Sector

India is one of the few countries in the world with an advanced space program. The Indian commercial space sector is on the threshold of a significant change. In May 2020, the Indian government announced access for the Indian private sector to its space activities and programs, reflecting a paradigm shift in policy. India’s recent steps towards privatization potentially create opportunities for international space companies. As the Indian private sector anticipates playing a greater role in Indian space programs, Indian industry will look towards international cooperation and partnerships to develop and upgrade their capabilities. This would enable collaboration opportunities for U.S. space companies to partner with Indian industry to participate in India’s space programs.

CITY STOPS

New Delhi

The first stop on the mission itinerary is New Delhi, India’s capital and home to India’s Ministry of Civil Aviation, Ministry of Defense, and Airport Authority of India. In meetings with representatives of these government entities, mission delegates will learn about policies and opportunities in the country’s aerospace industry, including the Indian Government’s Aviation Cooperation Program, a public-private partnership with the U.S. Trade Development Agency, the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration and U.S. aviation companies designed to support India’s civil aviation sector modernization priorities.

 


Hyderabad 

Telangana has the most vibrant aerospace and defense ecosystem in India, and its capital Hyderabad is a major defense manufacturing hub with over a dozen major DRDO labs (Defense Research and Development Organization) and defense PSU (Public Sector Undertaking Units). There are also large private companies and over 1,000 small and medium-sized enterprises working in the aerospace sector. The state has attracted large investments from global OEMs, including Lockheed Martin, Boeing, Pratt & Whitney, and GE Aviation. Among strategic Indian players, TATA Group currently runs over 90 percent of its aerospace manufacturing from Hyderabad. Adani Group and Kalyani Group also established various projects though foreign joint ventures. Hyderabad is also home to GMR Aero Technic, the largest private MRO player in the country.  

Optional Stops Business Matchmaking (Gold Key Service) 

Mission participants may request Gold Key business matchmaking service at one of the other five CS posts in India: Bengaluru, Mumbai, Chennai, Ahmedabad, or Kolkata. The two most promising cities for this are Mumbai, India’s financial center, and Bengaluru, a technology and innovation hub.

Mumbai

Mumbai is one of the world’s top centers of commerce, and India’s financial center, industrial hub, and economic powerhouse. Mumbai contributes six percent of India’s GDP. The city is home to some of the largest Indian conglomerates, and is the India headquarters for many international companies, including in the aerospace, defense, advanced manufacturing, and financial services sectors. Mumbai’s international airport is the country’s second busiest airport in terms of international traffic and cargo traffic. The city also houses one of the country’s Naval commands, its top seaport, and primary customs zone. Mumbai is the headquarters for several major aerospace, defense, and MRO entities, and serves as the seat of decision making for conglomerates. Some of the major organizations include:

 


Bengaluru

Popularly referred to as the Silicon Valley of India, Bengaluru is the country’s high-tech hub and one of its principal commercial and industrial centers. With an estimated population of 12 million, the city is a leading aerospace and space technology hub and is home to many high-tech companies in defense, manufacturing, machine tools, ICT, electronics, and other industry sectors as well. Some of India’s premier advanced studies and scientific research establishments, including the Indian Institute of Science, National Aerospace Laboratories, the Indian Space Research Organization, and other state-owned entities like Hindustan Aeronautics Limited, and Bharat Electronics Limited are based in Bengaluru.

Other Products and Services   

This overview of the aerospace sector in India is not intended to be exhaustive, but it is illustrative of the many opportunities available to U.S. exporters. Applications from companies selling products or services within the scope of this mission, but not specifically identified, will be considered and evaluated by the U.S. Department of Commerce during the recruitment phase for this mission. Companies whose products or services do not fit the scope of the mission may contact their local U.S. Export Assistance Center (USEAC) to learn about other business development missions and services that may provide more targeted export opportunities.  Companies may call 1-800-872-8723, or go to http://help.export.gov/ to obtain such information. This information also may be found on the website: http://www.export.gov.

MISSION GOALS

The objective of this mission is to help U.S. firms in the aerospace industry find business partners and sell their products and services in India, so its primary focus is on export promotion.

The secondary objective is to address market access issues. India is focused on expanding investment into the country, and CS India has long espoused to the Government of India that investment follows exports. As such, exports need to come first, and though India has initiated a slew of protectionist measures that promote domestic production in the aerospace and related sectors, it needs to import technologies and rely on services of international OEMS and suppliers.

A further objective is to curb international competition. To varying degrees, Russian, French, British, and Israeli firms in the aerospace sector are active in India, and it is of strategic importance to the United States to bolster exports in this sector and related subsectors. 

MISSION SCENARIO

In New Delhi, trade mission delegates will meet with officials from the Ministry of Civil Aviation,  and the Airport Authority of India, and will take part in business matchmaking appointments with private-sector organizations. In addition, they will attend an Embassy briefing and networking event with multipliers. They will also learn from experiences shared by members of the U.S.-India Aviation Cooperation Program. For delegates in MRO, Post will schedule a walk-through of Air India Engineering Services Limited (AIESL) maintenance workshops in avionics, engines, hydraulic (accessories).

In Mumbai, the delegation will have meetings with private sector organizations and participate in site visits and business matchmaking services. In addition, delegates will meet multipliers and associations such as the MRO Association of India, American Chamber of Commerce Western Region, and U.S. India Importer’s Council to gain insights on the aerospace sector, regional opportunities, and the competitive landscape.

At spin-off stops in Bengaluru or Hyderabad, delegates will participate in one-on-one business matchmaking appointments.

Matchmaking efforts will involve multipliers such as the Confederation of Indian Industry, Federation of Indian Chambers of Commerce and Industry, the Indo-American Chamber of Commerce and the American Chamber of Commerce. Delegates will be counseled before and after the mission by U.S. Export Assistance Center trade specialists, including members of the Aerospace and Defense Technology Team. Participation in the mission will include the following:

 

  • Pre-travel briefings/webinar on subjects ranging from business practices in India to security;

  • Pre-scheduled meetings with potential partners, distributors, end-users, or local industry contacts in New Delhi and Hyderabad, with optional side-trips to Mumbai and Bengaluru;

  • Meetings with Indian Government officials;

  • Participation in industry receptions in New Delhi, and Hyderabad;

  • Meetings with CS India’s aviation industry specialists in New Delhi, Hyderabad, Mumbai, and Bengaluru;

  • Networking receptions in New Delhi and Hyderabad (TBC).

 

Proposed Timetable

 

*Note: The final schedule and potential site visits will depend on the availability of host government and business officials, specific goals of mission participants, and ground transportation.

 

Monday,
September 19, 2022

  • Trade Mission Participants Arrive in New Delhi, India

Tuesday,
September 20, 2022 

  • Plenary Session – U.S. Embassy officials welcome delegation

  • Market Briefing: The Aerospace Sector in India – Opportunities and Challenges

  • B2B and B2G Meetings for Mission Delegates in Delhi
  • Site visit at AIESL MRO workshops (TBC)
  • Reception Hosted by USIBC/USISPF/AmCham/Other (TBC)

Wednesday,
September 21, 2022 

  • B2B and B2G Meetings for Mission Delegates in Delhi

  • Flight to Hyderabad

  • Networking Reception Hosted by Local Chamber (TBC)

Thursday,
September 22, 2022

  • B2B and B2G Meetings for Mission Delegates in Hyderabad

  • Departure for Optional Spin-Offs

Friday,
September 23, 2022

  • B2B and B2G Meetings in Spin-Off Locations (Mumbai/Bengaluru)

  • Departure for the United States

 

PARTICIPATION REQUIREMENTS

All parties interested in participating in the trade mission must complete and submit an application package for consideration by the Department of Commerce. All applicants will be evaluated on their ability to meet certain conditions and best satisfy the selection criteria as outlined below. The mission will target a delegation of 15 firms, with a minimum of 10 to make the mission viable. 

FEES AND EXPENSES

After a firm or trade association has been selected to participate on the mission, a payment to the Department of Commerce in the form of a participation fee is required. The participation fee for the Aerospace Mission to India will be $2,800 for small or medium-sized enterprises (SME) [1]; and $5,500 or large firms or trade associations. The fee for each additional firm representative (large firm or SME/trade organization) is $1,000.  Expenses for travel, lodging, meals, and incidentals will be the responsibility of each mission participant.  Interpreter and driver services can be arranged for additional cost. Delegation members will be able to take advantage of U.S. Embassy rates for hotel rooms.

When an applicant is selected to participate on a particular mission, a payment to the Department of Commerce in the amount of the designated participation fee below is required.  Upon notification of acceptance to participate, those selected have 5 business days to submit payment or the acceptance may be revoked. 

Participants selected for a trade mission will be expected to pay for the cost of personal expenses, including, but not limited to, international travel, lodging, meals, transportation, communication, and incidentals, unless otherwise noted. Participants will, however, be able to take advantage of U.S. Government rates for hotel rooms. In the event that a mission is cancelled, no personal expenses paid in anticipation of a mission will be reimbursed. However, participation fees for a cancelled mission will be reimbursed to the extent they have not already been expended in anticipation of the mission.

If a visa is required to travel on a particular mission, applying for and obtaining such a visa will be the responsibility of the mission participant. Government fees and processing expenses to obtain such a visa are not included in the participation fee. However, the Department of Commerce will provide instructions to each participant on the procedures required to obtain business visas.

Trade Mission members participate in trade missions and undertake mission-related travel at their own risk.  The nature of the security situation in a given foreign market at a given time cannot be guaranteed.  The U.S. Government does not make any representations or guarantees as to the safety or security of participants.  The U.S. Department of State issues U.S. Government international travel alerts and warnings for U.S. citizens available at https://travel.state.gov/content/passports/en/alertswarnings.html.  Any question regarding insurance coverage must be resolved by the participant and its insurer of choice.

CONDITIONS FOR PARTICIPATION

Applicants must submit a completed and signed mission application and supplemental application materials, including adequate information on their products and/or services, primary market objectives, and goals for participation that is adequate to allow the Department of Commerce to evaluate their application.  If the Department of Commerce receives an incomplete application, the Department may either: reject the application, request additional information/clarification, or take the lack of information into account when evaluating the application.  If the requisite minimum number of participants is not selected for a particular mission by the recruitment deadline, the mission may be cancelled. 

Each applicant must also certify that the products and services it seeks to export through the mission are either produced in the United States, or, if not, are marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least fifty-one percent U.S. content by value. In the case of a trade association or organization, the applicant must certify that, for each firm or service provider to be represented by the association/organization, the products and/or services the represented firm or service provider seeks to export are either produced in the United States or, if not, marketed under the name of a U.S. firm and have at least 51% U.S. content.

A trade association/organization applicant must certify to the above for all of the companies it seeks to represent on the mission.

In addition, each applicant must:

·         Certify that the products and services that it wishes to market through the mission would be in compliance with U.S. export controls and regulations;

·         Certify that it has identified any matter pending before any bureau or office in the Department of Commerce;

·         Certify that it has identified any pending litigation (including any administrative proceedings) to which it is a party that involves the Department of Commerce; and

·         Sign and submit an agreement that it and its affiliates (1) have not and will not engage in the bribery of foreign officials in connection with a company’s/participant’s involvement in this mission, and (2) maintain and enforce a policy that prohibits the bribery of foreign officials.

In the case of a trade association/organization, the applicant must certify that each firm or service provider to be represented by the association/organization can make the above certifications.

SELECTION CRITERIA

Targeted mission participants are U.S. firms, services providers and trade associations/organizations providing or promoting U.S. products and services that have an interest in entering or expanding their business in the mission’s destination country. The following criteria will be evaluated in selecting participants:

·         Suitability of the applicant’s (or in the case of a trade association/organization, represented firm’s or service provider’s) products or services to these markets;

·         The applicant’s (or in the case of a trade association/organization, represented firm’s or service provider’s) potential for business in the markets, including likelihood of exports resulting from the mission; and

·         Consistency of the applicant’s (or in the case of a trade association/organization, represented firm’s or service provider’s) goals and objectives with the stated scope of the mission.

Balance of company size and location may also be considered during the review process.

Referrals from a political party or partisan political group or any information, including on the application, containing references to political contributions or other partisan political activities will be excluded from the application and will not be considered during the selection process. The sender will be notified of these exclusions.

TIMELINE FOR RECRUITMENT AND APPLICATIONS

Mission recruitment will be conducted in an open and public manner, including publication in the Federal Register, posting on the Commerce Department trade mission calendar (http://export.gov/trademissions) and other Internet web sites, press releases to general and trade media, direct mail, notices by industry trade associations and other multiplier groups, and publicity at industry meetings, symposia, conferences, and trade shows.   Recruitment for the mission will begin immediately and conclude no later than August 1, 2022. The U.S. Department of Commerce will review applications and inform applicants of selection decisions on a rolling basis.  Applications received after  August 1 will be considered only if space and scheduling constraints permit.

 

Contacts

  1. Geoffrey Parish
    Principal Commercial Officer, North India
    U.S. Commercial Service, New Delhi, India
    Tel: +91-11-2347 2000
    Email:
    geoffrey.parish@trade.gov

 

  1. Raghavan Srinivasan
    Commercial Officer
    U.S. Commercial Service, New Delhi, India
    Tel: +91-11-2347 2000
    Email:
    raghavan.srinivasan@trade.gov

 

  1. Nisha Wadhawan
    Commercial Specialist
    U.S. Commercial Service, New Delhi, India
    Tel: +91-11-2347 2000
    Email:
    nisha.wadhawan@trade.gov
     
  2. Shamli Menon
    Commercial Specialist
    U.S. Commercial Service, Mumbai, India

     
  3. Theodore Immanuel 
    Commercial Specialist
    U.S. Commercial Service, Hyderabad, India

     
  4. Manjushree Phookan 
    Commercial Specialist
    U.S. Commercial Service, Bengaluru, India

     
  5. Amy Magat
    Sr. International Trade Specialist

    U.S. Commercial Service, Downtown Los Angeles, CA
    Tel: +1 (213) 276-2990

    Email: amy.magat@trade.gov
     
  6. Oscar Magaña
    International Trade Specialist
    U.S. Commercial Service, San Antonio, TX
    Tel: +1 (210) 419-3043

    Email: oscar.magana@trade.gov
     
  7. Meredith Boyle
    International Trade Specialist (Aerospace & Defense)

    Office of Transportation and Machinery
    Tel: +1 (202) 839-2437
    Email: meredith.boyle@trade.gov

 


[1] For purposes of assessing participation fees, an applicant is a small or medium-sized enterprise (SME) if it qualifies under the Small Business Administration’s (SBA) size standards (https://www.sba.gov/document/support—table-size-standards), which vary by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code.  The SBA Size Standards Tool [https://www.sba.gov/size-standards/] can help you determine the qualifications that apply to your company. 

 

 

India Aerospace Mission Opportunities

Contact Us


Amy Magat

International Trade Specialist
U.S. Commercial Service
Los Angeles
213-894-3966
amy.magat@trade.gov

Oscar Magaña

International Trade Specialist
U.S. Commercial Service
San Antonio
210-419-3043
oscar.magana@trade.gov